Monthly Archives: July 2017

Creating Beautiful Beautiful Gardens Requires the Right Places or Hydroponics

Choosing the best supplies is the key determinant of healthy, quality and outstanding plants thus, giving your garden a more pleasant look. There are varieties of garden supplies that will help you give your plants all the necessary care required during growth. The hydroponic supplies are meant to improve your plant’s performance as well as making your organic gardening work easier and fun.

The aim of this article is to provide you with more insight that will help you make better decisions based on the following gardening categories

Water Filtering Systems: It ensures that your plants remain healthy by pre-treating your water. Water that is used to water your plants is passed through these filters that remove any chlorine from water that can cause adverse effect to soil and plants in your organic gardening. Water filters eliminates the chlorine which could have otherwise killed soil microbiology in the soil. Therefore, purchasing a good water filter system will ensure that your garden soil remains fertile by providing the much needed minerals and vitamins that ensure your plants grow healthier in your garden.

Soil Treatment: Treating your gardening soil is the first step that you should emphasize on to ensure your plants get the required optimum soil conditions for proper growth. Major soil treatments in gardening usually focus on nutrients level, soil PH and mineral deficiencies.

Bud Trimming Machine: They are useful garden equipment that helps you prune the unwanted protruding leaves. You can as well use them to cut roots and in the preparation of flower petals. They ensure that you handle your plants safely without making any unnecessary damage. They are found in different varieties to suit your gardening preferences.

Grow Tent: Grow tents enable you to develop a perfectly controlled garden area a micro-environment Grow Room / Grow Cabinet where you can specifically control temperature and humidity levels and photoperiod lighting. They are made of light proof construction that does not allow light leaks which can lead to possible plant problems during the growth and flowering period.

Aeroponics Systems: Aeroponics systems have widely been used by many individuals in their effort of growing clones, veggies as well as herbs. The method entails growing of plants without use of any soil. Water with nutrient solutions is used where the roots of the plants are spread in order to absorb the essential nutrients. Aeroponics systems are available in different varieties at affordable prices.

Greenhouse Controllers: Use of a green house controller in your garden ensures that your plants are within the optimal environment for proper growth. All your crops will be protected from harmful pests and diseases as well as from harsh environmental conditions. Purchasing a greenhouse controller will ensure that your plants remains protected at all time and you are assured of better quality produce at the time of harvest.

PH/EC/TDS Meters: They are necessary equipment that every gardener must have. Whether you do indoor gardening, hydroponic gardening or green house gardening, they are equipment that will help you test for many issues. This equipment will enable you test your soil pH levels quickly so that you can know the best ways to adjust the soil Ph. In addition, they will also help you make calibrations on your Ph meters.

Plant Pots and Containers: Growing your plants in plant pots or containers is the most convenient form of gardening. There are many benefits that come with containers gardening. Plant pots and containers are easily movable and thus, you can even choose to grow your plants either on your balcony, courtyard, indoors and many other places. With containers, less weeding is needed and you also avoid using heavy gardening equipment. Plant pots and containers also give your plants an optimum environment for their growth because monitoring is easy.

Garden Accessories: Having proper accessories makes your garden appear more attractive and eco-friendly. These amenities will make your gardens a better place to visit and enjoy. Garden accessories such as furniture for gardens, lightning, outdoor cooking or outdoor heaters are some of the best garden accessories that you should consider purchasing so as to give your gardens an elegant look and style.

Hydroponic Nutrients: Use of plant nutrient in gardening is a modern trend that every gardener needs to embrace. It involves growing your plants without soil and instead uses solutions containing essential nutrients that your plants require for proper growth. Hydroponic nutrients provide an easy way of farming as it does not require any soil testing or much labor which saves you a lot of gardening costs. It supplies your plants with all the required nutrients thus ensuring that your plants are grown in the best conditions.

Pest and Disease Control: Controlling pests and diseases in your garden is very essential. For your plants to grow and thrive well, they require a disease and pest free environment. Therefore, you should ensure that you have set aside proper mechanism for your pest and disease control. In fact, pests are the ones that transfer diseases to your plants. Thus, purchasing the proper supplies will ensure that all your plants remains healthy and yields more at the harvest seasons.

Rooting and Propagation: This type product provides faster plants generation by rooting the stem cuttings and propagating the cuttings. They easily produce roots after a short while and you can use them to increase the amount of crops that your garden produces. This method saves you the cost of purchasing seeds and it also reduces the germination period of some plants. The process of rooting and propagation is not labor intensive because plants take less time to produce roots and develop.

Growing Media: Despite the fact that hydroponic gardening is a soil-free gardening, growing media are necessary as they provide support to your plants roots. They also help in maintain the necessary oxygen/water ratio so that your plants remain healthy. There are different varieties of growing media to choose from in the market that comes with different features according to your preferences.

Fans and Blowers: Are you having problems with frequent falling leaves in your garden? To maintain cleanliness and keep a good condition in your garden, fans and blowers are the best choice for all your landscaping needs. Blowers ensure that you remove fallen leaves from your garden with ease compared to using other tiresome tools such as hand rakes. Fan and blowers are available in the market with different features at affordable prices. They will help you conduct all your landscaping needs with ease.

Grow Lights: Grow lamps are the best choice for your indoor gardening. Especially when you want to start seeds, growing lights provides optimal conditions that ensure you get healthy green seedlings. Selecting an indoor lighting system that matches your preferred plants will ensure that your crops grow in a well controlled environment with the right light intensity required by plants.

Odor Remover: Bad odor smell in our gardens is something that can make them unpleasant for us to visit and work. That’s why it’s necessary for us to ensure that we get rid of all odors and make our gardens fresh and smart. Odor removers are found in different forms that you can spray to your garden and they eliminate any bad smell in your garden and you stay protected for up to one month. Charcoal filters are the preferred choice for indoor gardens.

Air Ducting: Air ducting equipment ensures that your gardening containers or greenhouses remain air-tight. They are designed to give you a tight waterproof and prevent unnecessary leakages. They are also primarily used for moving air in and out of your indoor garden or green house.

Garden Irrigation Systems: Garden irrigation systems have gained a lot of popularity in modern gardening today. They have been designed to ease the gardening work and make it enjoyable. By relieving the gardener of the hassles and legwork of irrigation, gardeners now spend little time when watering their plants. The other benefit of using the garden irrigation systems is improved efficiency through systems such as drip irrigation compared to traditional methods. Gardeners should embrace these irrigation systems for optimum gardening benefits.

6 Useful Tips About Home and Wooden Home Wood for Your Garden

1.Building regulations and planning permission

“My garden and my rules” is unfortunately not exactly the way it works with setting up a summer house or any other building in your garden. Whether you need to apply for a planning permit or not depends on the size and height of the building, ways of use, location in the garden and other details. There are two separate issues when considering a new garden building – Building Regulations and Planning Permission. In most cases, if the building has an internal floor space up to 15m² and its overall height is less than 2.5m, it is very unlikely that you’ll need any Building Regulations or Planning Permissions at all. Even if your garden building is within the limits, it is still wise to contact your local planning office and get all the answers to your questions. This will give you peace of mind to be sure that everything goes to plan with your new garden office or a hobby room. Should your desired summer house or a garden room exceed the limits, don’t worry and don’t give up your dream! In this case you should call or visit your local planning office and get a proper instruction of what you need to do in order to meet all the rules and get the required permissions. Our previous experience with clients getting planning permission for larger garden buildings, is that it takes no more than 4-6 weeks.

2.Peculiarities of wooden buildings. Proper care.

Wood is a natural material, growing and adapting depending on the temperature, humidity and other weather conditions especially during the first month after the assembly. It is common that you must adjust doors and windows a few times during the first month after the wooden cabin has been erected and then once or twice in a year to keep them functioning properly. Small cracks, knots and color tone differences are not errors but inherent qualities of wood. It is important to treat your garden house with wood preservative stain or other protective coatings straight after the assembly. Untreated wood becomes grayish, and can turn blue and become moldy or rot. We recommend that you treat floor boards with a wood impregnation agent before installation, especially the bottom sides of the boards, because after the assembly you have no more access to that side. Having been properly treated, your log cabin’s lifespan has been increased significantly. It is wise to inspect your summer house once in the year and retreat accordingly to the instructions set by the wood preservative manufacturer.

3.Size of your garden building

It is very important to think about the use of your garden building and buy the right size. Wooden summer houses are something we want you to enjoy for many years and not just a season. Therefore we would recommend you involve all the family members or users of the summer house, ask everybody’s opinion and make a collective decision.

4.What will I get, what is inside the package and how are the log cabins are delivered?

Your log cabin or garden building will be delivered in water proof packages, so that they will not be influenced or damaged by the weather during the shipping or if your packed summer house or garden office stays packaged for several weeks outside before the installation. Delivery of your order is curbside delivery and the driver is not able to assist with the unpacking of your garden building. The size of vehicle and method of delivery will depend on the size of the building you have ordered. It will be delivered on a vehicle equipped with one of the following facilities: tail lift, forklift truck or hiab crane able to unload and move heavy packages (700-2500 kilos). All wooden details and panels have been prefabricated, precut and ready to install (like a giant Lego set!). Standard log cabin kit consists of impregnated foundation beams, untreated wall logs / panels and other wooden details, roof and floor boards, windows and doors, roofing felt, screws, nails and other fixings, storm braces, user manual and assembly instructions. All details are numbered to make assembly as easy as possible. All you need to supply is the tools!

5.Foundations / Base for your Garden Building

Required foundation type depends on the size of your garden building and the firmness of the ground in your garden. The easiest and cheapest foundation type is concrete slabs set on sand and gravel. This foundation type is fairly simple to construct and can be done by a DIY novice without having to hire in a professional. This type of base is suitable for smaller cabins up to 10 m2. To achieve this base you will need to dig out 25-30 cm ground, fill it with gravel and then a good layer of sand to provide a level surface. Then, finally lay down the concrete slabs, blocks or similar. It is vital that your base is level as your cabin will only be as level as your base! The most popular, but more expensive and durable foundation type is a concrete base. A concrete base is a perfect fit for all types of garden buildings. For preparing that kind of base you will probably need to hire a local professional or small building company, because concrete foundations involve more know-how and you really have to know what you are doing. These two are the most popular foundation types for garden buildings, but there many other ways to do it. It is good to consult with local experts before you choose, taking in to account the firmness of the existing ground and size of your intended building. Whatever your choice, you have to know that a firm and level foundation is crucial! If you fail with the foundation you will fail with your entire garden building. Twisted walls and non functioning doors and windows as well as very short life span and voided warranty will mean you do not enjoy your garden building!

6.Self assembly or hiring a building company?

The assembly of most garden buildings, summer houses and log cabins is achievable by a competent DIY enthusiast. Especially small and mid-sized summer houses and sheds up to 8-12 m2. We would always recommend that two people undertake the assembly and that care is taken with lifting as some of the panels are heavy. Our statistics show that 85% of our clients do the assembly themselves or hire one local expert for assistance to make sure that everything goes well. For the assembly of your garden building you need at least 2 adults, tools (hammer, saw, pliers, drill, screwdriver, measuring tape, ladder, knife and spirit-level) and not forgetting 1-3 days of your precious time, depending on your skills and the size of your log cabin. If, at least, you or your companion is familiar with fixing some things at home or doing some small DIY projects in the garden, assembly with prefabricated details, proper installation instructions and user manual should be achievable for you. But, if you are not confident in your DIY ability or just don’t fancy the assembly then we would recommend you hire a local professional.

Quote about Gardening

From the gardener who tends a single geranium in her windowsill, to the one who supplies bountiful bouquets of roses to floral shops, many people have spoken many words about the art and skill and benefits of gardening. Let’s listen in to some of their voices, historical and contemporary, for in them we may discover the gardener deep within the soil of our soul:

Gardening gives one back a sense of proportion about everything – except itself. ~May Sarton, Plant Dreaming Deep, 1968.

The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing something better than they have ever done before.–Vita Sackville-West, 1892 – 1962.

My green thumb came only as a result of the mistakes I made while learning to see things from the plant’s point of view. ~H. Fred Ale.

I have found, through years of practice, that people garden in order to make something grow; to interact with nature; to share, to find sanctuary, to heal, to honor the earth, to leave a mark. Through gardening, we feel whole as we make our personal work of art upon our land.–Julie Moir Messervy, The Inward Garden, 1995, p.19.

Gardening requires lots of water – most of it in the form of perspiration. ~Lou Erickson.

As the biocentric view suggests, the garden prospers when control is balanced by equal measures of humility and benevolence. A balance is struck. Control, servitude, respect, imagination, pragmatism, an ecological conscience, compliance, and a certain measure of mysticism and altruism all meld together to provide nurturance. Try to separate the various aspects into their constituent parts – grant any one of them the status of fundamental gardening definition and one soon skews the entire process. Put them back together again in the service of the two-way street called nurturance, and we express the state of grace called gardening.–Jim Nollman, Why We Garden: Cultivating a Sense of Place, 1994, p. 106.

There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling. ~Mirabel Osler.

The home gardener is part scientist, part artist, part philosopher, part plowman.
He modifies the climate around his home.–John R. Whiting.

Gardening is a matter of your enthusiasm holding up until your back gets used to it.–Unknown.

Gardening is an exercise in optimism. Sometimes, it is a triumph of hope over experience.–Marina Schinz.

The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. ~George Bernard Shaw, The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God, 1932.

Science, or para-science, tells us that geraniums bloom better if they are spoken to. But a kind word every now and then is really quite enough. Too much attention, like too much feeding, and weeding and hoeing, inhibits and embarrasses them. ~Victoria Glendinning.

In gardens, beauty is a by-product. The main business is sex and death. ~Sam Llewelyn.

The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses. ~Hanna Rion.

In my garden there is a large place for sentiment. My garden of flowers is also my garden of thoughts and dreams. The thoughts grow as freely as the flowers, and the dreams are as beautiful. ~Abram L. Urban.

It is good to be alone in a garden at dawn or dark so that all its shy presences may haunt you and possess you in a reverie of suspended thought. ~James Douglas, Down Shoe Lane.

Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your green beans. ~Marcelene Cox.

God made rainy days so gardeners could get the housework done. ~Unknown.

I used to visit and revisit it a dozen times a day, and stand in deep contemplation over my vegetable progeny with a love that nobody could share or conceive of who had never taken part in the process of creation. It was one of the most bewitching sights in the world to observe a hill of beans thrusting aside the soil, or a rose of early peas just peeping forth sufficiently to trace a line of delicate green. ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses from and Old Manse.

Don’t wear perfume in the garden – unless you want to be pollinated by bees. ~Anne Raver.

Take thy plastic spade,

It is thy pencil; take thy seeds, thy plants,

They are thy colours.~William Mason, The English Garden, 1782.

It is a golden maxim to cultivate the garden for the nose, and the eyes will take care of themselves. ~Robert Louis Stevenson.

Gardening is about enjoying the smell of things growing in the soil, getting dirty without feeling guilty, and generally taking the time to soak up a little peace and serenity. ~Lindley Karstens, noproblemgarden.com.

I know that if odour were visible, as colour is,
I’d see the summer garden in rainbow clouds.~Robert Bridges, “Testament of Beauty”.

Unemployment is capitalism’s way of getting you to plant a garden. ~Orson Scott Card.

How fair is a garden amid the trials and passions of existence. ~Benjamin Disraeli.

Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made
By singing: -“Oh, how beautiful!” and sitting in the shade. ~Rudyard Kipling, “The Glory of the Garden”.

You can bury a lot of troubles digging in the dirt. ~Unknown.

Garden writing is often very tame, a real waste when you think how opinionated, inquisitive, irreverent and lascivious gardeners themselves tend to be. Nobody talks much about the muscular limbs, dark, swollen buds, strip-tease trees and unholy beauty that have made us all slaves of the Goddess Flora. ~Ketzel Levine’s talkingplants.com.

On every stem, on every leaf,… and at the root of everything that grew, was a professional specialist in the shape of grub, caterpillar, aphis, or other expert, whose business it was to devour that particular part. ~Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Half the interest of a garden is the constant exercise of the imagination. ~Mrs. C.W. Earle, Pot-Pourri from a Surrey Garden, 1897.

No two gardens are the same. No two days are the same in one garden. ~Hugh Johnson.

We have descended into the garden and caught three hundred slugs. How I love the mixture of the beautiful and the squalid in gardening. It makes it so lifelike. ~Evelyn Underhill, Letters.

I think that if ever a mortal heard the voice of God it would be in a garden at the cool of the day. ~F. Frankfort Moore, A Garden of Peace.

Last night, there came a frost, which has done great damage to my garden…. It is sad that Nature will play such tricks on us poor mortals, inviting us with sunny smiles to confide in her, and then, when we are entirely within her power, striking us to the heart. ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, The American Notebooks.

Despite the gardener’s best intentions, Nature will improvise. ~Michael P. Garafalo, gardendigest.com.

Many things grow in the garden that were never sown there. ~Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732.

In order to live off a garden, you practically have to live in it. ~Frank McKinney Hubbard.

Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers where I can walk undisturbed. ~Walt Whitman.

Gardens always mean something else, man absolutely uses one thing to say another. ~Robert Harbison, Eccentric Spaces, 1977.

Gardens… should be like lovely, well-shaped girls: all curves, secret corners, unexpected deviations, seductive surprises and then still more curves. ~H.E. Bates, A Love of Flowers.

I never had any other desire so strong, and so like to covetousness, as that one which I have had always, that I might be master at last of a small house and a large Garden. ~Abraham Cowley, The Garden, 1666.

One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show.

Earth is here so kind, that just tickle her with a hoe and she laughs with a harvest. ~Douglas William Jerrold, about Australia, A Land of Plenty.

I have never had so many good ideas day after day as when I worked in the garden. ~John Erskine.

Green fingers are the extension of a verdant heart. ~Russell Page.

There is no gardening without humility. Nature is constantly sending even its oldest scholars to the bottom of the class for some egregious blunder. ~Alfred Austin.

It is utterly forbidden to be half-hearted about gardening. You have got to love your garden whether you like it or not. ~W.C. Sellar & R.J. Yeatman, Garden Rubbish, 1936.

A garden was the primitive prison, till man with Promethean felicity and boldness, luckily sinned himself out of it. ~Charles Lamb, 1830.

Let no one think that real gardening is a bucolic and meditative occupation. It is an insatiable passion, like everything else to which a man gives his heart. ~Karel Čapek, The Gardener’s Year, translated by M. and R. Weatherall, 1931.

Most people who possess anything like an acre, or half of it, contribute weekly to the support of a gentleman known as Jobbing Gardener. You are warned of the danger that he may prove to be Garden Pest no 1. ~C.E. Lucas-Phillips, The New Small Garden.

Tomatoes and squash never fail to reach maturity. You can spray them with acid, beat them with sticks and burn them; they love it. ~S.J. Perelman, Acres and Pains, 1951.

I appreciate the misunderstanding I have had with Nature over my perennial border. I think it is a flower garden; she thinks it is a meadow lacking grass, and tries to correct the error. ~Sara Stein, My Weeds, 1988.

It takes a while to grasp that not all failures are self-imposed, the result of ignorance, carelessness or inexperience. It takes a while to grasp that a garden isn’t a testing ground for character and to stop asking, what did I do wrong? Maybe nothing. ~Eleanor Perényi, Green Thoughts, 1981.

The kiss of the sun for pardon,
The song of the birds for mirth,
One is nearer God’s heart in a garden
Than anywhere else on earth.~Dorothy Frances Gurney, “Garden Thoughts”.

I don’t think we’ll ever know all there is to know about gardening, and I’m just as glad
there will always be some magic about it!–Barbara Damrosc.h

Gardening is civil and social, but it wants the vigor and freedom of the forest and the outlaw. ~Henry David Thoreau.

It is always exciting to open the door and go out into the garden for the first time on any day.–Marion Cran.

Gardening is a kind of disease. It infects you, you cannot escape it. When you go visiting, your eyes rove about the garden; you interrupt the serious cocktail drinking because of an irresistible impulse to get up and pull a weed. ~Lewis Gannit.

Gardening is any way that humans and nature come together with the intent of creating beauty.–Tina James, 1999.

When you have done your best for a flower, and it fails, you have some reason to be aggrieved. ~Frank Swinnerton.

Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are.–Alfred Austin.

A garden really lives only insofar as it is an expression of faith, the embodiment of a hope and a song of praise.–Russell Page, The Education of a Gardener, 1962.

The best fertilizer is the gardener’s shadow. ~Unknown.

Gardening is a labour full of tranquility and satisfaction; natural and instructive, and as such contributes to the most serious contemplation, experience, health and longevity.–John Evelyn, 1666.

By the time one is eighty, it is said, there is no longer a tug of war in the garden with the May flowers hauling like mad against the claims of the other months. All is at last in balance and all is serene. The gardener is usually dead, of course. ~Henry Mitchell, The Essential Earthman, 1981.

Create a new atmosphere with gardening at home

During his 40-year career as a garden writer and photographer, Derek Fell has designed numerous garden spaces, many involving his wife Carolyn. The best example of their work can be seen at their home, historic Cedaridge Farm, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. There, they have designed more than twenty theme areas, including shade gardens, sunny perennial borders, tapestry gardens involving trees and shrubs, a cottage garden, herb garden, cutting garden and an ambitious water garden.

Derek worked as a consultant on garden design to the White House during the Gerald Ford Administration. Derek designed Ford’s ‘Win’ garden, following his ‘Win Speech’, advising the nation ten ways to fight inflation.

Many garden designs by Derek Fell have been implemented without inspecting the site. The great late architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed beautiful homes for his clients, entirely from photographs without the need for a site inspection.

Fell’s garden spaces have been featured in newspapers, magazines, books and also on television, including Architectural Digest, Gardens Illustrated, The Garden (the magazine of the Royal Horticultural Society), Country Gardens, HGTV, QVC and PBS.

Derek has authored more than sixty books and garden calendars, including 550 Home Landscaping Ideas (Simon & Schuster), The Encyclopedia of Garden Design (Firefly Books), The Complete Garden Planning Manual (Friedman), Garden Accents (Henry Holt) and Home Landscaping (Simon & Schuster).

Curb appeal and ambiance are important to brighten up your propoerty or prepare it for sale. Feel free to ask Derek any garden related questions regardless of how big or small.

SOME GARDEN TYPES

Water Garden. Water is the music of nature. It can be tricked over stones, cascaded from a great height so its crashes onto rocks. It can fall in a solid sheet or as silver threads. A beautiful water garden with waterfalls and stepping stones can be located in sunlight or shade. The water garden shown here is located at Cedaridge Farm. It includes a pool for dipping, and it features both a collection of koi and hardy water lilies. A popular water garden design features a koi pool fed by a series of waterfalls, and the water re-circulated through filters to keep the water clear.

Sunny Perennial Border. This can be formal or informal, square, rectangular, round and kidney shaped, in the form of an island bed or backed against a decorative hedge, wall or fence. Plants can be chosen to produce a parade of color through all the seasons, or concentrated for a particular season. Color themes can be polychromatic like a rainbow, monochromatic (for example all white – perfect for a wedding), or it can feature an Impressionist color harmony, such as yellow and purple; orange and blue; red, pink and silver; blue, pink and white; even black and white or black and orange (one of Monet’s favorites). A popular perennial garden design is two parallel border with a grass path leading to a focal point such as a sculpture or gazebo.

Tropical Garden. You do not need to live in a frost-free area to have a beautiful tropical garden. At Cedaridge Farm we have two – one is a tribute to the design philosophy of the late Roberto Burle Marx, who designed dramatic tropical gardens around Rio. It is in a lightly shaded area and features plants that are hardy (like ‘Sum & Substance’ hosta) but look tropical and tender plants that are tender (like banana trees and tree ferns) that either need moving indoors during winter or can be discarded like annuals at the end of the season. Our second tropical space is a patio with tropical plants grown in containers.

Shade Gardens. We design two kinds of shade gardens – one where the plants provide mostly foliage interest (like ferns, hostas, heuchera and hakone grass), and plants that flower well (like impatiens, coleus, and lilies), or a combination of the two.

Woodland Garden. Whether you have existing woodland or you need to create a woodland from scratch, the result can be sensational. Decide whether you want deciduous trees that provide fall color or evergreens that stay green all winter, or a mixture. At Cedaridge we made a ‘cathedral’ garden where the existing trees are trimmed high so the trunks look like the columns of a cathedral, and the branches arch out to meet overhead like the vaulted ceiling of a cathedral. Below, we provide two more layers of interest, at ground level and the under-story.

Vegetable Garden. We can design you an easy-care garden of raised beds where vegetables are planted in blocks or an edible landscape where edibles are grown for ornamental effect. We can provide the plan for a garden that was approved for the White house during the Ford Administration where Derek Fell worked as a garden consultant. Derek Fell’s book, “Vegetables – How to Select, Grow & Enjoy”, won a best book award from the Garden Writers Association.

Herb Garden. The herb garden at Cedaridge Farm is a ‘quadrant design’, feature in numerous calendars and books, including Derek Fell’s ‘Herb Gardening for Beginners.’ We can also provide a cartwheel design or a parterre herb garden for bountiful harvests of fresh herbs. The Herb Garden can also do double-duty as a vegetable garden.

Cutting Garden. The cutting garden at Cedaridge Farm features bulbs such as tulips and daffodils for spring, and ever-blooming annuals to follow the bulbs so armloads of flowers can be harvested from April through October.

Victorian Garden. A garden with romantic overtones! Imagine a white gazebo framed by mostly white flowers for a wedding in the family. Or choose from among several color harmonies, such as yellow and blue, red, pink and silver, or blue, pink and white.

Cottage Garden. You don’t need a cottage to have a cottage garden. But if you do, such as a guest cottage, why not wrap it in shrub roses and climbers, plus those delightful English cottage garden plants like poppies, sunflowers and pinks. We also like to include plants to attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

Stream Garden. Lucky you if you have an existing stream to be landscaped. At Cedaridge Farm we have a stream, but when we moved here it was overgrown with poison ivy and brambles. Today it is criss-crossed with bridges, and beds of moisture-loving plants like astilbe and water iris. If you don’t have a stream, but would like one, we can create a design where the water is re-circulated along one that’s man-made but looks natural.

Orchard. You don’t need a lot of space for a productive orchard. By making the right choices, fruit trees can be grown in containers or espaliered against fences and walls to save space. Peaches and apples can be trained over arbors. Just a few plants of small fruits like strawberries and raspberries can be highly productive.

Bog Garden. Ideal for soils that tend to remain moist all season, bog gardens can be extremely colorful and highly imaginative, incorporating stepping stones and bridges to cross wet areas, and growing some of nature’s most diverse plant families, such as water iris, Japanese primroses, astilbe and waterlilies.

Japanese Garden. The problem with many Japanese gardens is a tendency to use pseudo-Japanese elements such as Chinese dragons. Derek Fell has twice traveled to Japan, has written award-winning articles about Japanese garden design, and has the experience to design authentic-looking spaces in the Japanese tradition using elements of Zen or Feng Shui, or a combination of the two disciplines to create a magical space.

Italian Garden. Although Italian gardens can be highly ostentatious, requiring steep slopes to achieve the best effect, like the Villa d’Este, near Rome, small spaces can achieve the aura of an Italian garden. Derek Fell has not only visited some of the finest Italian Gardens, such as La Mortola on the Italian coast, and Boboli overlooking Florence, he has toured and photographed the Vatican Gardens.

French Formal Garden. The elaborate style of Versailles Palace and Vaux le Vicompte, may be beyond your means, but elements of French garden design, such as a parterre garden, can be incorporated in small spaces.

Monet’s Garden. This beautiful artist’s garden north of Paris contains more than a hundred special planting ideas to create what Monet considered his greatest work of art. Moreover, his planting ideas have undoubtedly inspired more new garden design than any other garden. Monet’s arched bridge, his waterlily pond, his arches leading to the entrance of his house, and his color harmonies are just some examples of Monet’s innovation that people today like to emulate.

Tapestry Garden (Trees & Shrubs). The great French Impressionist artist, Paul Cezanne’s garden, in Provence, is composed mostly of trees and shrubs, not only as a labor saving device, but to provide a tapestry of color from leaf colors, leaf texture and leaf shapes. What could be more appealing than to look out of a window of your home at a rich foliage panorama, including all shades of green from light green to dark-green, plus blue, silver, gold, bronze?

Hillside Garden. Even dry hillsides can make beautiful rock gardens, with paths twisting and turning in a zig-zag to create a visual adventure from the top of the slope to the bottom. They can be terraced and threaded with streams to create waterfalls and planted with some of nature’s most beautiful plant forms. Bridges, benches and belvedere are some of the structural elements that can add interest to a hillside.